UH-1F Eglin AFB 1966   UH-1F DMAFB, AZ 1967   UH-1F Malmstrom AFB 1967   UH-1F Eglin AFB 1969   UH-1F Edwards AFB 1971   UH-1F Ellisworth AFB 1971   UH-1N FT. Bragg 1973   HH-1H Hill AFB 1974   UH-1F F.E. Warren 1975   UH-1F Ellsworth AFB 1982   UH-1F Whiteman AFB 1982   UH-1N Bahamas 1984   UH-1 Ellsworth AFB 1986   UH-1N Edwards-Jan-1991   UH-1N Edwards-Oct-1991   UH-1N Kirtland AFB 1996   UH-1N 1998   UH-1N F.E. Warren AFB 1999   UH-1N Kirtland AFB 2002   TH-lH Ft. Rucker 2009   UH-1N Malmstrom AFB 2010   UH-1N Kirtland AFB 2011   UH-1N Minot AFB 2013   CH-3C Malmstrom AFB 1965   CH-3C Sheppard AFB Mar. 1967   CH-3 Sheppard AFB Nov. 1967   CH-3E Midair in Laos 1970   HH-3E Korea 1973   HH-3E Elmendorf AFB 1974   HH-3E Iceland 1979   CH-3E Patrick AFB, 1984   HH-3E Osan 1984   HH-3E 29-Palms 1988   HH-3E Kadena 1989   CH-3E DMAFB 1989   H-5G Ladd AFB 1951   H-5H Maxwell AFB 1953   H-5 New York 1958   H-13G Niagara Falls 1955   H-13 Bryan AFB, TX 1957   H-19A San Marcos 1952   H-19A O'Neill, NB. 1953   H-19B Alexandria, LA. 1954   H-19B Austria 1954   H-19B France 1954   H-19B Korea 1954   H-19B March AFB 1954   H-19B Rhine Main AB 1955   H-19B Eglin AFB 1955   H-19 Skaneateles Lake, NY 1956   H-19 Ashiya Japan 1957   H-19 Edwards AFB 1957   H-19 Niagra Falls 1959   H-19 Sheppard   H-19B Loring AFB 1960   H-19 Beal AFB 1963   H-19 Larson AFB 1963   H-19 Saigon, RVN 1964   YH-21 Thule AB 1953   H-21 Goose Bay 1954   H-21A San Marcos TX 1955   H-21B Tennesse 1955   H-21 San Diego, CA 1956   H-21 Alaska 1957   H-21 Goose Bay 1958.   SH-21 Greenland 1958   H-21 Elmendorf AFB 1958   H-21 Dugway Proving Grnd. 1958   H-21 Goose Bay 1959   H-21 Greenland 1959   CH-21B Otis AFB 1959   H-21 Indian Springs AAF 1961   H-21 Luke AFB 1961   H-23B Moody AFB 1953   H-43A James Connally AFB 1959   H-43B Loring AFB 1961   H-43B Westover AFB 1961   HH-43B MacDill AFB, FL 1964   HH-43B Stead AFB 1965   HH-43B Clark AB, PI 1966   H-43 Sheppard AFC, TX 1966   HH-43B Phan Rang 1968   HH-43B MacDill AFB 1969   HH-43B Hill AFB 1973   HH-53C Eglin AFB 1969   CH-53C Germany 1975   CH-53C Germany 1976   HH-53C Woodbridge 1977   HH-53C Kadena AB 1979   HH-53B Kirtland AFB 1981   HH-53C Kirtland AFB 1982   MH-53 Philippines 1984   CH-53C Pope AFB 1984   HH-53C Hickam AFB, HI 1985   HH-53C Hill AFB 1986   HH-53H Nellis AFB 1986   MH-53J Korea 1995   HH-53B Vance AFB 1996   HH-53B Cherry Point 1998   MH-53J Ft. Bragg 1999   MH-53M RAF Mildenhall 2000   MH-53 Durango CO 2002   MH-53M USNS Kanawha 2002   MH-53M Afghanistan 2003   MH-53M FOL Hurlburt Fld 2003   MH-53M Kuwait 2003   MH-53M Hurlburt Fld. 2007   UH-60A Pope AFB 1987   HH-60G New York 1991   MH-60G Antigua 1991   HH-60G Great Salt Lake 1992   HH-60G Davis-Monthan AFB 1994   HH-60G Korea 1994   HH-60G Indian Springs 1998   HH-60G Al Jabar AB 1999   HH-60G Avon Park 2001   HH-60G Mt. Hood 2002   HH-60G Afghanistan 2002   HH-60G Afghanistan 2003   HH-60G Afghanistan 2004   HH-60G Angel Fire, NM 2005   HH-60G Kandahar 2007   HH-60G Afghanistan 2009   HH-60G Okinawa 2013   HH-60G Lakenheath 2014   HH-60G Lakenheath 2014 1   HH-60G Lakenheath 2014 2   Ellsworth AFB 1955   Hawaii crash 1963   Patuxent River NAS 1960   Randolph AFB 1957   Spokane River, WA 1959   Tyndall AFB 1961   Wright-Patterson 1956   Spokane River 1972  

UH-1N S/N 69-6612

Kirtland Air Force Base, NM

08 August 2002



On 8 August 2002 at approximately 1610 (all times are local), the mishap aircraft (MA), a UH-1N, S/N 69-6612, crashed on Pad 8 of the auxiliary field (N34-57.16 W106-33.95), approximately 5 NM south of the Albuquerque International airport. The crew on the MA consisted of five people, the mission instructor pilot (MIP), two mission student pilots (MSP1, MSP2), mission flight engineer (MFE), and a student flight engineer (SFE). The MA was on a scheduled contact check ride on the MSFE, a contact training flight on the MSP2, and an ungraded remedial training flight on the MSP1. All three students were in UH-1N qualification training. The MSP1 had been graded "unsatisfactory" in manual fuel operations on the previous day's recommendation flight for manual fuel operations due to an over speed on the manually controlled engine. The MA too-off seven minutes early at 1353 on a VFR flight plan to the auxiliary field. Two hours and 17 minutes after departure, the MA crashed on pad 8 of the auxiliary field. The aircraft was technically destroyed, but the crew was not injured. There was no damage to the landing site.


The accident was the result of pilot error brought on by MSP1 applyhing too much throttle to engine number 1, causing its power to exceed that of the automatically controlled #2 engine. This input results in what is called a swap, a condition where the manually controlled engine provides more power than the automatically controlled engine, effectively creating a single engine situation, and loss of power to the rotor system degrading its ability to produce lift thus causing the helicopter to rapidly descend. The MSP1's improper control of the MA #1 throttle (the manually controlled/ungoverned engine) placed the MA in a condition which resulted in a momentary loss of power to the automatically controlled engine, placing the MA in a single engine condition without the power to maintain either an in or out of ground effect hover, which resulted in the rapid loss of RPM's to the main rotor system and started an accelerating descent. Clear and convincing evidence indicates that once the MSP1 had made the throttle inputs it was impossible to arrest the decent of the helicopter due to the lack of time available to recover the #2 engine (governed engine) back to full operating power (2-5 seconds required) and the lack of altitude available to recover the rapidly decaying main rotor RPM (within the first second of the #2 engine reducing power, the main rotor had decayed to 92% of less). The aircraft was not recoverable at that point, the only question was at what rate of decent it would impact. The MIP's inputs in the 2-3 seconds he had to react where focused on leveling the MA and controlling the yaw axis to prevent MA rollover and blade to fuselage contact. These actions ensured that no serious injuries were suffered by the MA crew.